The Men With a Monopoly on Beluga Caviar in the U.S.

Caviar has, historically, been a luxury ingredient. Now it’s garnishing everything from potatoes to waffles to donuts. But there’s one kind that U.S. consumers haven’t been able to get.

True beluga caviar—the roe from a beluga sturgeon—has been illegal in America since 2005, when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) banned the import of all beluga products from the Caspian Sea.

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Intermittent Fasting Made My Life Easier, and Happier

At the urging of doctor friends and a few popular books, I embarked on a diet plan earlier this year called intermittent fasting. The basics are that I could eat the foods I enjoyed and most of my regular meals, but it had to be within a short time frame of eight to 10 hours. Outside of that, I would stick to water, tea and black coffee.

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The Japanese Spice Blend Taking Over America

A good bowl of ramen seems unimprovable, if not for the discrete, red-topped bottle often sitting aside it. Shake the jar and out falls an array of seasonings that brightens and heats simultaneously. This is shichimi togarashi, and it’s making its way from the ramen counter to the spice rack of fine-dining kitchens…

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Oregon Winemakers Turn Wildfire Losses Into Collectible Bottles

As climate change has become more destructive, and unpredictable weather more commonplace, the threat to vineyards has become unavoidable. But in the Rogue Valley in southern Oregon, a test case is unfolding that demonstrates that even in the face of sizable crop loss and broken contracts—and the resulting inability to re-sell a sensitive agricultural product before it rots—wine grapes can be rescued.

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Internet Beef Is Taking Advantage of Not-So-Hot Supermarket Meat

Plant-based cuisine was one of the biggest food trends of 2018. At the same time, beef sales were massive. Nielsen has reported that beef saw the biggest change in U.S. sales in the past few years, with almost 11 percent more pounds sold in 2018 than in 2015. Beef consumption is expected to continue to rise, to 58.8 pounds per person in 2019, 2.8 percent higher than last year, according to forecasts from the Cattle Site.

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Grocery Stores: The IoT of Food

Tired of comparisons to the much flashier internet, supermarkets are working hard to ditch their unsexy descriptor: big-box stores. These days you’ll find a Murray’s Cheese outpost in Kroger, a kombucha bar at Whole Foods and poke bowl counter at Albertsons. All these flashy foodie options are good distractions from what’s happening under the hood, which is that grocery stores — the physical four walls — are going digital.

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Why Kombucha May Never Make It Really Big

High fructose corn syrup, the ubiquitous sugar substitute blamed for slowly killing Americans through diabetes, obesity and heart disease, has been under assault for almost 15 years. One of its biggest users—the carbonated soda ecosystem—has been shrinking in the face of public health concern and plummeting soda consumption, now at its lowest point in three decades.

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Investing in Fine Wine Is More Lucrative Than Ever

Buying rare wines is like investing in a startup: You need ten years of runway to see significant returns. But unlike a startup, wine is a lot more lucrative these days.

Had you allocated $100,000 to Cult Wines, a U.K.-based wine portfolio manager, your money—which is to say your wine—would have returned an average of 13 percent annually. In 2016, its index performance was actually 26 percent.

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Route Optimization That Allows for Constant Change

When Layla Shaikley began brainstorming with three classmates, it was to fulfill an assignment in a class on entrepreneurship at MIT. The professor had challenged them to devise a technology that could change a billion lives. Focused on developing countries, the foursome looked at how to use data from volatile zones to draw conclusions about crime and personal safety.

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From Brewery to Bakery: A Flour That Fights Waste

For some people, beer is the perfect end to a workday. For Bertha Jimenez, it’s the start of a new way to eliminate food waste.

Breweries throw out millions of pounds of used grain every day that could have other uses. While some is repurposed as animal feed, compostable products or heating fuel, little has been exploited for its value as food.

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A Burger Joint Where Robots Make Your Food

When he was 9 years old, Alex Vardakostas started working at his parents’ fast-food restaurant in southern California, where he experienced firsthand the mindless repetition of flipping burgers. “Let’s be honest, it’s not the culmination of the human spirit,” said Vardakostas, now 33. His experience led him to a career in robotics.

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How to Launch an Acclaimed Winery for $8 Million or Less

Even by Napa Valley’s astronomical real estate standards, the sale of Heitz Wine Cellars for a reported $180 million raised eyebrows. It’s the new normal there, though: According to the Napa-based County Appraisals Inc., vineyard properties in the area now routinely go for $400,000 an acre.

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Always Counting Calories...

I’ve spent a lifetime reading nutrition labels on the back of packages and deciding whether to eat a food based on the number of calories it contained. After decades of being told that these were the units of energy that mattered most, I’d settled in to a weight, and a habit, that I didn’t love. Faced with a world full of new diets and compelling research, I was finally ready to ditch my calorie-counting routine.

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For Passover, These Orthodox Jews Are Cooking On Live TV

For Rabbi Chaim Lazaroff of Houston, Texas, the kitchen is his happy place. That's why, when he was asked to share a few Passover recipes on FOX 26 Houston, his local news station, he jumped at the opportunity. "If I could, I would cook all day," says the rabbi, who is also the co-director of Chabad of Uptown, a community center for Jewish people.

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Your Next Truffle May Be Coming From Greece

So you’re dining at a fancy restaurant and choose to splurge on some truffles to top off your repast. The server steps up and presents the vaguely ugly tuber. As the pungent slices rain down on your main course, the waiter announces that these truffles didn’t come from Italy, the traditional provenance of this decadent garnish. They hail from Greece.

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